Test: Vascular Access. Target Acquired. Anchored in Position. Mission Accomplished.

Vascular Access: Target Acquired. Anchored in Position. Mission Accomplished.

Vascular Access: Target Acquired. Anchored in Position. Mission Accomplished. An overarching goal of Vascular Access Specialists is to expertly provide a patient with a reliable vascular access device that will last until the end of need; for the ‘life of the line’. In her Vascular Access Talk at the 2022 AVA Scientific Meeting titled “Target…

2022 Year in Review

As 2022 ends, we would like to thank you for reading the Eloquest Healthcare Blog!  We hope you have found our posts during the last 12 months to be both informative and impactful to your professional career.  Here are some of the past year’s highlights that we invite you to visit… One of our favorite…

Randomized Controlled Trial Investigation Use of Liquid Adhesive to Increase Dressing Adherence & Reduce CVAD Failure

AVATAR Randomized Controlled Trial Jugular CVAD

A “STICKY” Situation: Randomized Controlled Trial Investigates Use of Liquid Adhesive to Increase Dressing Adherence & Reduce CVAD FailureCVADs – Essential Devices with High Failure Rates Central venous access devices (CVADs) are essential to the timely and effective treatment of critically ill patients. They deliver lifesaving drugs, nutrition, and blood products. Yet despite their importance,…

Mastisol ≠ Medical Adhesive – Related Skin Injury (MARSI)

The Importance of Skin Integrity Maintaining skin integrity is an important part of infection prevention throughout patient care. Skin is the body’s first line of defense, acting as a barrier to prevent harmful bacteria from entering the body. When this barrier is disrupted, pathogens can enter through the site of injury and cause infections.1 Skin…

Medical Adhesive-Related Skin Injury (MARSI) Causes and Prevention

It is well known that the use of medical adhesives is associated with potential skin damage during a variety of procedural and treatment courses, including vascular access. This skin damage can present as medical adhesive-related skin injury (MARSI). MARSI prevalence was examined in a study undertaken by Farris, et. al, to determine the scope of…

Text: Adhesive removal matters: protecting skin integrity

Adhesive Removal Matters: Protecting Skin Integrity

Adhesive Products are Common in Healthcare Adhesive products are staples of patient care. Inpatients are commonly exposed to a variety of adhesive products throughout their treatment duration. A study by Farris, et. al found that the median number of products per subject was 6.25 for patients in a cardiac‐telemetry unit and 3.0 for patients in…

Vascular Access Care & Maintenance: Avoid MARSI during Dressing Changes

In our previous blog, “MARSI Guidelines on Safe Adhesive Removal,” we discuss the one often overlooked hospital acquired condition (HAC) is medical adhesive related skin injury (MARSI). Its prevention should be on every institution’s radar. In this video, Jack LeDonne, MD, FACS, VA-BC, features a case example of mechanical skin injury related to the removal of…

Reducing CLABSI and MARSI Risk Through Improved Vascular Access Dressing Integrity

Vascular Access Dressing Adherence and Hospital-acquired Infections Central venous access device (CVAD) related infections have a 12‐25% mortality in ICU populations. [1] Due to dressing disruption, central line‐associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) may occur. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) agree that vascular access device (VAD) dressing…

MARSI Guidelines on Safe Adhesive Removal

Since the “pay for performance” era began, hospital acquired conditions (HAC) have deservedly received a great deal of attention from hospitals, healthcare providers, payors, patients and families. For critical medical devices that pose danger to patients if they are dislodged [like vascular access devices, (VADs)], safety requires proper securement. Poor securement of VADs increases the…

“Stressing the Dressing: Reducing Vascular Access Device Complications”

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) agree that vascular access device (VAD) dressing integrity is a critical factor for the prevention of hospital-acquired infection.1,2 Russell Nassof, JD, founder of RiskNomics, discusses the importance of common sense in evidenced-based medicine, the issue of dressing disruption, the prominence…