Surgical Scars: Prevalence and Importance of Prevention

Each year in the US more than 50 million surgeries are performed.1 Treatment of resulting surgical scars has driven decades of research, and it is estimated that in the US $20 billion per year is spent on scar treatment and management.2 Patients have made it clear that they are highly concerned about scarring after surgery…

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MARSI Guidelines on Safe Adhesive Removal

Since the “pay for performance” era began, hospital acquired conditions (HAC) have deservedly received a great deal of attention from hospitals, healthcare providers, payors, patients and families. For critical medical devices that pose danger to patients if they are dislodged [like vascular access devices, (VADs)], safety requires proper securement. Poor securement of VADs increases the…

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Getting Ahead of HAIs: Quick Observation Tools for HAI Prevention

In October of 2018, the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) working together with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched a series of Quick Observation Tools (QUOTs) to assist healthcare facilities in their infection prevention initiatives.[1] The tools, available for free download here, enable rapid assessment and remediation…

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Quality Improvement Initiative Findings: Vascular Access Device Dressing Adhesion and Infection Rates

Vascular Access Devices and Dressing Adherence The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) agree that vascular access device (VAD) dressing integrity is a critical factor for the prevention of hospital‐ acquired infection. [1,2] In fact, dressing disruption is a major risk factor for central line‐associated bloodstream infections…

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“Stressing the Dressing: Reducing Vascular Access Device Complications”

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) agree that vascular access device (VAD) dressing integrity is a critical factor for the prevention of hospital-acquired infection.1,2 Russell Nassof, JD, founder of RiskNomics, discusses the importance of common sense in evidenced-based medicine, the issue of dressing disruption, the prominence…

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