Reducing CLABSI and MARSI Risk Through Improved Vascular Access Dressing Integrity

Vascular Access Dressing Adherence and Hospital-acquired Infections Central venous access device (CVAD) related infections have a 12‐25% mortality in ICU populations. [1] Due to dressing disruption, central line‐associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) may occur. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) agree that vascular access device (VAD) dressing…

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3 Questions with Michelle Devries MPH, CIC, VA-BC

We are excited to launch a new production, a video series entitled, “3 Questions With…” 3 Questions With… features some of the finest thought leaders in healthcare specialties such as Infection Prevention, Vascular Access, Surgical Care and more. These experts answer questions on the latest insights, evidence and current practices. For our premier 3 Questions…

Surgical Scars: Prevalence and Importance of Prevention

Each year in the US more than 50 million surgeries are performed.1 Treatment of resulting surgical scars has driven decades of research, and it is estimated that in the US $20 billion per year is spent on scar treatment and management.2 Patients have made it clear that they are highly concerned about scarring after surgery…

Quality Improvement Initiative Findings: Vascular Access Device Dressing Adhesion and Infection Rates

Vascular Access Devices and Dressing Adherence The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) agree that vascular access device (VAD) dressing integrity is a critical factor for the prevention of hospital‐ acquired infection. [1,2] In fact, dressing disruption is a major risk factor for central line‐associated bloodstream infections…

“Stressing the Dressing: Reducing Vascular Access Device Complications”

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) agree that vascular access device (VAD) dressing integrity is a critical factor for the prevention of hospital-acquired infection.1,2 Russell Nassof, JD, founder of RiskNomics, discusses the importance of common sense in evidenced-based medicine, the issue of dressing disruption, the prominence…

Mastisol® Liquid Adhesive: Evidence‐Based Decision Making for the Prevention of Catheter‐Related Blood Stream Infections

The public health burden associated with catheter‐related bloodstream infection (CRBSI*) is substantial. A publication reviewing the qualitative and quantitative evidence supporting the use of Mastisol® Liquid Adhesive for the reduction of CRBSI can be downloaded here. In this blog, we’ll review the important findings detailed in this publication.       CRBSI vs CLABSI These two…

Addressing the Dressing: Improving Vascular Access Dressing Disruption

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) agree that vascular access device (VAD) dressing integrity is a critical factor for the prevention of hospital acquired infection. Michelle DeVries, BS, MPH, CIC, VA-BC, Senior Infection Control Officer at Methodist Hospitals, Indiana, reviews current practice guidelines, the emerging literature, and her…

LVADs: Minimizing Driveline Infections at Home

The previous blog of this 2‐part series focused on Left Ventricular Assist Devices (LVADs), including the prevalence of use, the types of patients treated, and the associated risks of LVAD‐associated infections. (View Blog 1 of 2) Part 2 of the series will focus on minimizing driveline infections once the patient goes home. LVADs have revolutionized…

3 Important Scar Management Guidelines

You may remember in the last blog, the considerable number of surgeries performed annually in the US was presented (51.4 million)1, along with the lack of patient satisfaction of scarring after surgeries. Data reviewed revealed that there was a significant amount of patient dissatisfaction with scarring after routine surgeries. Statistics showed that 91% percent of…